Research

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 


SRi Forensics is active in a number of research areas producing peer reviewed research literature looking at innovative developments in the field of imagery and forensics.

PUBLICATIONS

  1. 1.    Are facial image analysis experts any better than the general public at identifying individuals from CCTV images? C. Wilkinson, R. Evans. Science and Justice (2008), doi:10.1016/j.scijus.2008.10.011 Volume 49, Issue 3, September 2009, Pages 191-196 Copyright © 2008 Forensic Science Society
    Abstract - The aim of this study was to examine the accuracy and reliability of a small group of facial imagery experts, and compare their abilities with members of the general public, to ascertain whether or not training and experience will affect the ability to identify faces from CCTV footage. A number of clips from CCTV footage were utilised alongside face pools. The participants were asked to identify the actor in each CCTV clip and provide a level of confidence in the decision. The experts tested in this study were consistently better at identification than the public, with almost double the identification rates and half the errors. These results suggest that training and experience in facial analysis will produce more reliable and accurate facial identification.


  1. 2.    Using art to help understand the imagery of irritable bowel syndrome and its response to hypnotherapy. Carruthers, Helen; Miller, Vivien; Morris, Julie; Evans, Raymond; Tarrier, Nicholas; Whorwell, Peter. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, Volume 57, Number 2, April 2009 , pp. 162-173(12)
    Abstract - A medical artist asked 109 patients if they had an image of their IBS pre- and posthypnotherapy, making precise watercolor paintings of any images described. Results were related to treatment outcome, symptoms, anxiety, depression, and absorption (hypnotizability); 49% of patients had an image, and a wide variety were recorded and painted. Imagery was significantly associated with gender (p < .05), anxiety (p < .05), noncolonic symptomatology (p < .05), and absorption (p = .001); 57.8% of responders compared with 35.5% of nonresponders to hypnotherapy had an image of their disease (p < .05) before treatment, and color images were associated with better outcomes (p = .05) than monochrome ones. All images changed in responders, often becoming more nonspecific in nature. Inquiring about IBS imagery helps to identify potential responders and nonresponders to hypnotherapy and may also provide insights into how patients think about their illness.


  1. 3.    Advances in Forensic Human Identification. CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, published January 2014.
    Chapter 10 - Image Analysis: Forensic Facial Comparison: Issues and Misconceptions. Evans, R.
    Abstract - Chapter 10: As crime levels have increased, experts are more frequently called upon to express opinions on aspects of human identification in an attempt to identify either victims or criminals.  These experts come from disparate fields such as video analysis, medicine, medical art, anthropology and psychology, to name a few. With the increase in the day-to-day use of Closed Circuit Television (CCTV), the comparison of faces from images for forensic identification has become particularly important in the criminal justice system.

Links & Associations

SRi Forensics partners & associates

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